Common Core State Standard
SL.CCS.1/2/3/4 Grades 6-12: An essay of a current news event is provided for discussion to encourage participation, but also inspire the use of evidence to support logical claims using the main ideas of the article. Students must analyze background information provided about a current event within the news, draw out the main ideas and key details, and review different opinions on the issue. Then, students should present their own claims using facts and analysis for support.

FOR THE WEEK OF SEP. 12, 2011

Clues sent by Mars 'dune buggy' excite NASA scientists

frontpageactionpoints.gif
1.gif
Look for more news involving science, including meteorology (the study of weather).
2.gif
Engineers created the vehicle exploring Mars. Show a photo or article with anything else, large or small, designed by an engineer.
3.gif
Scientists study clues from the history of Mars. Try to find coverage or comments about something that happened in the past, especially long ago.

Talk about a long trip: An unmanned rover has been driving on Mars for more than seven years, though not constantly. Now the solar-powered exploratory vehicle with six wheels has reached a promising destination -- a sunken crater called Endeavour. And the first rock its long robotic arm picked up for remote-control analysis has opened a new chapter in the study of Mars.

NASA mission scientists are excited because the rock has sizable quantities of two elements that suggest geology formed by heat and water -- based on how things work here. Earlier evidence and now the presence of zinc and bromine, shown in data transmitted home, suggest a warmer, wetter period in Mars' past that may have offered friendlier conditions for some form of life. "The excitement level within the engineering and science teams is way up," says project scientist Ray Arvidson of Washington University in St Louis.

The dune buggy-size rover, named Opportunity, could spend years examining the new terrain. It's one of two that arrived in January 2004, landing on different sides of the planet with the goal of exploring the surface for signs of past water. Each already found evidence of water that suggests life might have been possible on ancient Mars, but that water was highly acidic. The other rover went silent after a sand trap last year. NASA plans to launch an SUV-size mobile lab in November that will reach Mars next summer. Its name, aptly, is Curiosity.

Astronomer says: "This rock doesn't look like anything else we've seen before" on Mars. -- Steven Squyres, Cornell University professor in Ithaca, N.Y.

NASA official says: "We have a very senior rover that's showing her age. . . . But in general, she's in good health." -- John Callas, project manager

Science writer says: "Nobody is predicting that [the rover] will find signs of life, ancient or modern. . . . The search is simply for evidence that Mars could at least have been hospitable to life, and the clues will be more geological than biological." -- Michael Lemonick, Time magazine

Front Page Talking Points is written by Alan Stamm for NIEonline.com, Copyright 2014
We welcome comments or suggestions for future topics: Click here to Comment

Front Page Talking Points Archive

Holiday tech gifts include new phone gadgets, app-driven robot, LEGO Technic, Skylanders tablet game

Police body cameras are pushed in wake of deaths sparking protests across U.S.

Calorie totals are coming to vending machines, popcorn counters and restaurants so we can eat smarter

Here comes the holiday shopping frenzy – with resistance to Thanksgiving Day sales

Why ‘net neutrality’ is in the news and how it affects you

Why you hear about ‘net neutrality’ and how its affects you

Space place crash makes trips by 'tourist' astronauts seem further out there

Here’s why midterm elections Tuesday in all states are important

Cable TV and dish antennas lose popularity as digital streaming expands

Federal response to Ebola grows as missteps spread concern

Complete archive