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for Grades K-4

Dec. 11, 2017
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For Grades K-4 , week of May 29, 2017

1.Those Champion Girls

In many countries of the world, girls’ sports struggle to get as much attention as boys’ sports. In the European nation of Spain, however, a girls’ soccer team has made people sit up and take notice. This spring, the AEM Lleida team joined a boys’ junior regional league and topped 13 boys’ teams to win the championship. AEM Lleida was led by 13-year old Andrea Gómez, who scored 38 goals to lead her team to the title. “I always try to show that soccer isn’t just for boys,” Gómez said. “If you’re technically better, you can compensate for being perhaps physically weaker.” In sports and other fields, women and girls are achieving success in many new ways. In the newspaper or online, find and closely read a story about a girl or woman who is successful. Use what you read to write a paragraph explaining what skills and personal qualities the girl or woman needed to achieve success, and any obstacles she had to overcome.

Common Core State Standards: Closely reading written or visual texts to make logical inferences from it; citing specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions.

2. Park Losing Its Glaciers

All over the world, global warming and climate change are having dramatic effects on natural areas. In the United States, one of the most famous National Parks is feeling the results. Glacier National Park in the state of Montana is losing its ice glaciers. According to a new study, the 37 glaciers remaining in the park are vanishing, and it appears likely that most will melt and disappear entirely in the next 20-30 years. In the last 50 years, glaciers at the park have shrunk an average of 39 percent, and some have lost 85 percent of their size, according to the study by the U.S. Geological Survey and Portland State University. “There is no chance they will go into rebirth,” said one researcher. “They will certainly be gone before the end of the century.” Global warming and climate change are affecting natural areas all over the world. In the newspaper or online, find and closely read a story about one effect of warming on a natural area. Use what you read to create a poster explaining this effect and what it will mean to the area. Give your poster an eye-catching headline.

Common Core State Standards: Using drawings or visual displays when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or points; conducting short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

3. What a Skydive!

People who want adventure often turn to unusual sports. This spring, a man in the European nation of England went skydiving — and set a new world record at age 101! Bryson William Hayes, known as “Verdun,” set the record for oldest person participating in a two-person tandem dive. His record-breaking jump came just a year after he made his first dive to celebrate his 100th birthday. “Last year's skydive was an amazing experience,” Hayes said. “I must have got a … taste for it, because it just made me want to do it again.” Hayes jumped from 15,000 feet with eight family members from three other generations. What would you like to do for an adventure? In the newspaper or online, find and closely read a story about an activity you would like to try as an adventure. Use what you read to draw a series of comic strips showing yourself having this adventure and what you learned from it.

Common Core State Standards: Using drawings or visual displays when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or points; writing narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.

4. Save Those Pets

When firefighters battle house fires, they often rescue people and save their lives. In some cases, they also save the lives of pets by giving them oxygen or treating burns. That is against the law in some states, because firefighters aren’t trained as veterinarians. In the state of Maryland, however, lawmakers have changed the law to allow firefighters and other rescue crews to treat animals without a penalty. The law also protects them from being sued in court for treating an animal. Twenty-two states now have passed laws like this, and others are considering similar moves. Animal rights leaders say such laws not only benefit pets, but could help police dogs if they were injured while working. Firefighters and rescue crews help people and save lives every day — often risking their own safety while doing it. In the newspaper or online, find and closely read a story about a firefighter, police officer or rescue crew that helped someone or saved a life. Use what you read to write a short editorial, telling how the actions of the rescuer could inspire others.

Core State Standards: Producing clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to the task; citing specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions.

5. A Potter Theft

A handwritten copy of an unpublished Harry Potter story has been stolen from a private home in the European nation of Great Britain. The 800-word story was written on two sides of a 6-by-8-inch postcard by author J.K. Rowling and auctioned off to raise money for charity in 2008. British news media reported that the untitled story was a “prequel” describing events that took place before the start of the Harry Potter books. It features Harry Potter’s father James and his best friend Sirius Black, according to reports, and the two have an encounter with two non-magical “muggle” policemen following a high-speed chase. Rowling and police urged fans to turn down offers to buy the stolen manuscript and to report offers to police. Fans of popular books and movies often imagine new adventures the characters could have. In the newspaper or online, read about a book or movie you like. Then brainstorm an idea for a new adventure for one or more of the characters. Write the opening of your story and share with the class.

Common Core State Standards: Writing narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events; conducting short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.