ad


Click here for printer-friendly version

Go to
Lessons for

Grades 1-4
Grades 5-8

Past lessons
for Grades 9-12

Dec. 11, 2017
Dec. 04, 2017
Nov. 27, 2017
Nov. 20, 2017
Nov. 13, 2017
Nov. 06, 2017
Oct. 30, 2017
Oct. 23, 2017
Oct. 16, 2017
Oct. 09, 2017
Oct. 02, 2017
Sep. 25, 2017
Sep. 18, 2017
Sep. 11, 2017
Sep. 04, 2017
Aug. 28, 2017
Aug. 21, 2017
Aug. 14, 2017
Aug. 07, 2017
July 31, 2017
July 24, 2017
July 17, 2017
July 10, 2017
June 26, 2017
June 19, 2017
June 12, 2017
June 05, 2017
May 29, 2017
May 22, 2017
May 15, 2017
May 08, 2017
May 01, 2017
Apr 24, 2017
Apr 17, 2017
Apr 10, 2017
Apr 03, 2017
Mar. 27, 2017
Mar. 20, 2017
Mar. 13, 2017
Mar. 06, 2017

For Grades 9-12 , week of Apr 03, 2017

1.Training Black Coders

In an effort to attract more African Americans to computer careers, Google has announced it will partner with Howard University to open “Howard West” on Google’s campus in Mountain View, California. At the new location, students from the historically black university in Washington, D.C., will get high level coding instruction, learn about tech culture, and see how one of the world's most famous tech companies operates. Between 25 and 30 juniors and seniors from Howard will spend 12 weeks at Google this summer, receiving instruction from senior Google engineers and Howard faculty and getting course credit for their studies. The program is an outgrowth of Google's effort to recruit more software engineers from historically black colleges and universities to address the severe shortage of African Americans in its workforce, particularly in technical roles. Recruiting more minorities to the technology field is a goal of leaders in business, government and the community. In the newspaper or online, find and closely read about efforts to recruit minorities into tech careers. Then use what you read to write a recruitment letter to a top high school student, offering reasons he/she should get into tech. Discuss letters as a class.

Core State Standards: Producing clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to the task; citing specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions; engaging effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

2. Too Much Me

Geno Auriemma is one of the most successful coaches in college basketball, so when he speaks up people listen. His University of Connecticut women’s team won 111 straight games before losing in the Final Four last weekend as it sought its fifth consecutive NCAA title. Yet as successful as he’s been, Auriemma says the attitude of players coming out of high school can be as big a challenge as opposing teams. In remarks that went viral on the Internet, Auriemma said “they’re always thinking about themselves. It’s me, me, me, me, me. ‘I didn't score, so why should I be happy?’ ‘I’m not getting enough minutes; why should I be happy?’” Recruiting “enthusiastic kids” who play for the love of the game and want to support teammates “is harder than it's ever been,” Auriemma said. Coaches often talk about getting players to play “the right way.” How they do that varies from coach to coach. In the newspaper or online, find and closely read about the approach of one successful coach. Use what you read to write a sports column summarizing the approach that makes this coach successful — and how you would coach if you were in a coaching position.

Common Core State Standards: Writing opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information; citing specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions.

3.Ban on Electronics

In an effort to thwart terrorism, the United States and Great Britain have banned passengers from airports in 10 Muslim-majority countries from carrying laptop computers, iPads and other devices larger than a cellphone aboard direct inbound flights. The ban was put in place after the U.S. and British intelligence agencies received information that the Islamic State terrorist group is developing a bomb that can be hidden in portable electronics. U.S. officials said the new restrictions did not indicate there was a threat of an imminent attack, but officials said the explosives were designed to be hidden in laptop batteries. The United States has banned electronics on some flights in the past in response to terrorism threats. The fight against terrorism is an ongoing one because there are always new threats or possible threats. In the newspaper or online, find and closely read stories about efforts to combat terrorism. Write a paragraph or short essay assessing the efforts and which you thing will be the most successful over time.

Common Core State Standards: Writing informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly; citing specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions.

4.Eating Disorders Strike Millions

About 30 million Americans suffer from eating disorders at some time in their lives, the National Eating Disorders Association estimates. It urges early intervention, noting: “Three minutes can save a life. Get screened, get help, get healthy.” Eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia affect about 20 million women and 10 million men in the United States. They are often misunderstood or misclassified as vanity issues or choices when in fact they can be severe illnesses — and even fatal in some cases. In the newspaper or online, find and closely read stories about eating disorders and how they can be dealt with. Then use what you read to brainstorm a public service television ad to reach and teach families and teens about the problem. Write an outline for your ad, including images you would use. Write the opening scene in the style of a movie screenplay.

Common Core State Standards: Conducting short research projects that build knowledge about a topic; writing informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly; writing narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events.

5.Coffee Good for Your Health?

Many people like coffee to give them a pick-me-up in the morning or other parts of the day. But how much coffee is good for you? New research links three to five cups of coffee a day to an overall lower risk of death — as compared to those who drink only a cup or two, or no coffee at all. In a study published in the journal Circulation, researchers admit, “We’re not sure exactly how coffee is [linked] to all these benefits.” But they note the “benefits” include better brain and liver health, and less risk of several types of cancer. Photographers often are called on to illustrate stories in eye-catching and effective ways. In the newspaper or online, find and study photos chosen to help tell different stories. Then imagine you have been assigned to take photos to show the benefits or appeal of coffee. Write out five ideas for photos, and why you think they would be effective. Draw sketches of them, if you like.

Common Core State Standards: Using drawings or visual displays when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or points; producing clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to the task.